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French open

The meaning of «french open»

The French Open (French: Internationaux de France de Tennis), officially known as Roland-Garros (French: [ʁɔlɑ̃ ɡaʁos]), is a major tennis tournament held over two weeks at the Stade Roland-Garros in Paris, France, beginning in late May each year.[c] The tournament and venue are named after the French aviator Roland Garros. The French Open is the premier clay court championship in the world. It is the second of the four annual Grand Slam tournaments.[3] The other three are the Australian Open, Wimbledon, and the US Open. The French Open is the only Grand Slam tournament held on clay. Until 1975, the French Open was the only major tournament not played on grass.[4] Between the seven rounds needed for a championship, the clay surface characteristics (slower pace, higher bounce), and the best-of-five-set men's singles matches, the French Open is generally considered the most physically demanding tournament in the world.[5][6]

Officially named in French les Internationaux de France de Tennis (the "French Internationals of Tennis" in English),[7][8] the tournament itself uses the name Roland-Garros in all languages, and it is often called the French Open in English.[9] (The stadium and tournament are both hyphenated as Roland-Garros because French spelling rules dictate that in the name of a place or event named after a person, the elements of the name are joined together with a hyphen.[10])

In 1891 the Championnat de France, which is commonly referred to in English as the French Championships, began. This was only open to tennis players who were members of French clubs. The first winner was H. Briggs, a Briton who resided in Paris and was a member of the Club Stade Français. In the final he defeated P. Baigneres in straight sets.[11] The first women's singles tournament, with four entries, was held in 1897. The mixed doubles event was added in 1902 and the women's doubles in 1907. This tournament was played until 1924, using four venues:

In the period of 1915–1919, no tournament was organized due to World War I.

In 1925, the French Championships became open to all amateurs internationally and was designated a major championship by the International Lawn Tennis Federation. It was held at the Stade Français in Saint-Cloud (site of the previous World Hard Court Championships) in 1925 and 1927, on clay courts. In 1926 the Croix-Catelan of the Racing Club de France hosted the event in Paris, site of the previous French club members only tournament, also on clay.

Another clay court tournament, called the World Hard Court Championships, is sometimes considered the true precursor to the modern French Open as it admitted international competitors. This was held at Stade Français in Saint-Cloud, from 1912 to 1914, 1920, 1921 and 1923, with the 1922 event held in Brussels, Belgium. Winners of this tournament included world No. 1s such as Tony Wilding from New Zealand (1913, 1914) and Bill Tilden from the US (1921). In 1924 there was no World Hard Court Championships due to tennis being played at the Paris Olympic Games.

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