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Russian air force

The meaning of «russian air force»

The Russian Air Force (Russian: Военно-воздушные силы России, tr. Voyenno-vozdushnye sily Rossii, VVS) is a branch of the Russian Aerospace Forces, the latter being formed on 1 August 2015 with the merging of the Russian Air Force and the Russian Aerospace Defence Forces.[7] The modern Russian Air Force was originally established on 7 May 1992 following Boris Yeltsin's creation of the Ministry of Defence; however, the Russian Federation's air force can trace its lineage and traditions back to the Imperial Russian Air Service (1912–1917) and the Soviet Air Forces (1918–1991).

The Russian Navy has its own independent air arm, the Russian Naval Aviation, which is the former Soviet Aviatsiya Voyenno-morskogo Flota (lit. "Aviation of the military-sea fleet"), or AVMF.

Emperor's Military Air Fleet (1909–1917)

Russian Socialist Federative Soviet Republic

Workers and Peasants Red Air Fleet (1918–1991)

Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Commonwealth of Independent States

Military Air Forces of the USSR (1918–1992)

Aviation of the Military Maritime Fleet (1918–1992)

Military Air Forces of the Russian Federation (1991–present[update])

Aviation of the Military Maritime Fleet (1991–present[update])

Strategic Rocket Forces (1991–present[update])

Following the dissolution of the Soviet Union into its fifteen constituent republics in December 1991, the aircraft and personnel of the Soviet Air Forces—the VVS were divided among the newly independent states. General Pyotr Deynekin, the former deputy commander-in-chief of the Soviet Air Forces, became the first commander of the new organisation on 24 August 1991. Russia received the majority of the most modern fighters and 65% of the manpower. The major commands of the former Soviet VVS—the Long-Range Aviation, Military Transport Aviation and Frontal Aviation were renamed, with few changes, Russian VVS commands. However, many regiments, aircraft, and personnel were claimed by the republics they were based in, forming the core of the new republics' air forces. Some aircraft in Belarus and Ukraine (such as Tupolev Tu-160s) were returned to Russia, sometimes in return for debt reductions, as well as a long-range aviation division based at Dolon in Kazakhstan.

During the 1990s, the financial stringency was felt throughout the armed forces made its mark on the Russian Air Forces as well.[8] Pilots and other personnel could sometimes not get their wages for months, and on occasion resorted to desperate measures: four MiG-31 pilots at Yelizovo in the Far East went on hunger strike in 1996 to demand back pay which was several months overdue, and the problem was only resolved by diverting unit money intended for other tasks.[9] As a result of the cutbacks, infrastructure became degraded as well, and in 1998, 40% of military airfields needed repair.

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