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Wrtv

The meaning of «wrtv»

WRTV, virtual channel 6 (UHF digital channel 25), is an ABC-affiliated television station licensed to Indianapolis, Indiana, United States. The station is owned by the E. W. Scripps Company. WRTV's primary studios are located on Meridian Street in northwestern Indianapolis (in the middle of Indianapolis' Television Row), with a secondary studio at Monument Circle in downtown Indianapolis; its transmitter is located on the city's northwest side near Meridian Hills, Indiana.[3]

The station first signed on the air on May 30, 1949, as WFBM-TV. Founded by the Consolidated Television and Radio Broadcasters subsidiary of the Bitner Group, owners of radio station WFBM (1260 AM, now WNDE), it is the oldest television station in the state of Indiana. The first program broadcast on the station was a documentary titled Crucible of Speed, about the early history of the legendary Indianapolis 500 auto race; this was followed by the inaugural live television broadcast of the event. The station originally operated as a CBS affiliate, although it maintained secondary affiliations with ABC and the DuMont Television Network.

WFBM-TV began to split ABC programming with Bloomington-based primary NBC affiliate WTTV (channel 10, which moved to channel 4 in February 1954) when that station signed on in November 1949; both stations lost their affiliations with ABC to WISH-TV (channel 8) when that station signed on in July 1954. WFBM-TV also aired programs from the short-lived Paramount Television Network, among them Time For Beany,[4] Dixie Showboat,[5] Hollywood Reel,[6] Cowboy G-Men,[7] and Hollywood Wrestling.[8] Channel 6 acquired an FM sister in 1955 with the sign-on of WFBM-FM (94.7 FM, now WFBQ). In 1956, WFBM-TV became the market's NBC affiliate, taking the affiliation from WTTV. During the late 1950s, the station was also briefly affiliated with the NTA Film Network.[9]

Bitner sold its broadcasting interests to magazine publisher Time-Life in 1957.[10][11] In the mid-1960s, WRTV became the first television station in Indiana to begin broadcasting its programming in color.

In late October 1970, WFBM-AM-FM-TV were sold to McGraw-Hill in a group deal that also involved Time-Life's other radio and television combinations in Denver, San Diego and Grand Rapids, Michigan; and KERO-TV in Bakersfield, California.[12] In order to comply with the Federal Communications Commission's new restrictions on concentration of media ownership that went into effect shortly afterward, McGraw-Hill was required to sell the radio stations in Indianapolis, Denver, San Diego and Grand Rapids to other companies. Time-Life would later take WOOD-TV in Grand Rapids out of the final deal and retain ownership of that station.[13] By the time the sale was finalized in June 1972, the purchase price for the entire group was just over $57 million. KERO-TV, KLZ-TV (now KMGH-TV) in Denver and KOGO-TV (now KGTV) in San Diego were retained by McGraw-Hill along with WFBM-TV. The radio stations retained the WFBM designation; McGraw-Hill asked for a set of call letters containing the letters "TV"[2] and received the call letters WRTV on June 2.[14]

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