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X-men (film series)

The meaning of «x-men (film series)»

X-Men is an American superhero film series based on the fictional superhero team of the same name, who originally appeared in a series of comic books created by Stan Lee and Jack Kirby and published by Marvel Comics. 20th Century Fox obtained the film rights to the characters in 1994, and after numerous drafts, Bryan Singer was hired to direct the first film, released in 2000, and its sequel, X2 (2003), while the third installment of the original trilogy, X-Men: The Last Stand (2006), was directed by Brett Ratner.

After each film outgrossed its predecessor, several spin-off films were released, including three Wolverine films (2009–2017), four X-Men prequel films (2011–2019), and two Deadpool films (2016–2018), with The New Mutants concluding the series in 2020, after a 20-year-long run.

With thirteen films released, the X-Men film series is the eighth-highest-grossing film series, having grossed over $6 billion worldwide.

In March 2019, Marvel Studios obtained the film rights to X-Men after Disney acquired 21st Century Fox. In October 2020, the films in the X-Men series, along with the Fantastic Four films, were rebranded as Marvel Legacy Movies on Disney+.[1]

The film introduces Logan and Rogue into the conflict between Professor Xavier's X-Men and the Brotherhood of Mutants, led by Magneto. Magneto intends to mutate world leaders at a United Nations summit with a machine he has built to bring about acceptance of mutantkind, but he was not aware that this forced mutation will result only in their deaths.

In 1993, 20th Century Fox and producer Lauren Shuler Donner bought the film rights to the X-Men.[2] Andrew Kevin Walker was hired to write, and James Cameron expressed interest in producing.[3] Eventually, Bryan Singer signed on to direct in July 1996. Although he was not a comic book fan, Singer was fascinated by the analogies of prejudice and discrimination that X-Men offered.[2] John Logan, Joss Whedon, Ed Solomon, Christopher McQuarrie, and David Hayter wrote the script, with Hayter receiving sole credit.[2][4] Principal photography began in September 1999 in Toronto, Canada, and ended in March 2000.[5] The film was released on July 14, 2000.[6]

Colonel William Stryker brainwashes and questions the imprisoned Magneto about Professor Xavier's mutant-locating machine, Cerebro. Stryker attacks the X-Mansion and brainwashes Xavier into locating every mutant on the planet to kill them. The X-Men must team up with the Brotherhood to prevent Stryker's worldwide genocide.

Hayter and Zak Penn were hired to write their own scripts for the sequel, which Singer would pick, with an aim to release the film in December 2002.[7][8] Michael Dougherty and Dan Harris were hired to re-write the script in February 2002, writing around 26 drafts and 150 on set.[9] Principal photography began in June 2002 in Vancouver, Canada, and ended in November 2002. The film was released on May 2, 2003.[7]

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